University Counseling Services

University Counseling Services

Give us a call at 620-235-4452 to schedule an appointment.

Hours:

Monday through Friday  8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Summer Hours:

Monday through Thursday  8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Friday  8:00 AM - 12 NOON

University Counseling Services supports the academic mission of the university by providing psychological counseling and outreach services to PSU students that facilitate personal growth, student learning, and successful academic progress.


Concerned about a PSU Student?


Information for Faculty & Staff
  • Information
  • Identifying a Student in Distress
  • Assisting a Student in Distress
  • What to Do in a Crisis
  • How to Make a Referral to University Counseling Services
  • Maintaining Boundaries

Most college students will encounter personal, social, and academic stressors during their educational experience and often discover ways to cope with these stressors. However, some demands can become unmanageable and interfere with the student’s academic progress.  

Faculty and staff play an essential role in helping students with emotional distress for two reasons:

  1. You are often the first to notice when a student is in distress; and

  2. Students often turn to informal advisers first for help; you may be the first point of contact for students needing support, guidance, and/or referral.

UCS has developed a list of useful tips to assist you and your efforts in responding to students who may need assistance.

A student should be referred to either UCS or SHS whenever you believe their difficulty has gone beyond his or her capacity to manage the situation, and beyond your own experience and expertise to help.  Such a referral may likely be brought on by a change in a student’s behavior and/or declining academic performance.  Signs may include:

Concerning Behaviors:

  • Change in personal hygiene

  • Dramatic changes in weight

  • Falling asleep in class

  • Loss of interest in activities

  • Emotional outbursts or crying

  • Increased anxiety, hyperactivity, or inflated self-esteem

  • Withdrawal from social interactions

  • Agitation, restlessness, or aggressive comments

  • Misuse of alcohol or drugs

Academic Concerns:

  • Worsening test performance

  • Excessive absences or tardiness

  • Decreased quality of work

  • Reduced class participation

  • Repeated requests for favors or extensions on homework

  • Failing to meet deadlines/due dates

  • Frequent requests for appointments that go beyond that of a typical student

  • Excessive demands or dependency on faculty and staff

Stressful Life Events:

  • Relationship difficulties/conflicts

  • Traumatic loss of a friend or family member

  • Being a victim of assault or abuse

  • Conflicts with roommates or residential living staff

References to Suicide or Homicide:

  • Verbal or written references to suicide

  • Referencing feelings of hopelessness

  • Noting they feel like a burden, not belonging, or trapped

  • Homicidal threats

A single sign may not be cause for concern; however, changes that are noticeably severe or chronic may be indicative of a more serious problem.

First, differentiate between urgent and non-urgent situations. If a student is an imminent risk to themselves, see What to Do in a Crisis. Otherwise, you may choose to address your concerns with the student directly. Your attention and concern may be enough to help the student manage their situation. If the situation is non-urgent, these tips may be useful to remember:

  • Be available, listen carefully, and talk with the student. Make the effort to communicate and connect with the student. Your willingness to listen shows that you care. 

  • Be aware of your physical surroundings. Try and find a location that is private and free of distractions.

  • When you meet with a student, put aside all other work in order to give him or her your full attention.

  • Communicate acceptance to the student. Communicate in an "adult-adult" manner rather than resorting to a "parental" or "superior-subordinate" approach.

  • Help the student clarify what might be causing thier distress and the impact it is having on his or her life. 

  • Encourage the student to assume responsibility for managing his or her situation.

  • Encourage the student to think of coping methods that have been effective in the past.

  • Take time to follow-up with the student.

  • If at follow-up the student has made no progress managing their current situation, they may need a a referral to UCS, SHS, or another appropriate agency on or off campus.

We don’t expect faculty and staff to provide counseling, but opening up a dialogue might mean the difference between a person receiving help or not receiving help. A student should be referred to either UCS or SHS whenever you believe his or her difficulty has gone beyond their capacity to manage the situation and beyond your own experience and expertise to help. Call us at 620-235-4452 or visit us at the Bryant Student Health Center.

If you have a concern regarding behavioral/general concerns, violations of university policy, or misconduct which does not involve domestic or dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, harassment, retaliation, or bias based discrimination please report below.

Distiguishing between a "theoretical" discussion of suicide and the personal anguish of "not knowing if life is worth living" can be difficult. If you're uncertain about a student's intentions, simply ask them to clarify their thoughts. There is no harm in discussing the topic of suicide in an open manner. If in the course of your conversation with a student, the how, when, and/or where of suicide is specified, you should immediately refer for help (this includes both verbal and/or written threats). Here is a list of potential contacts; who you contact first may vary depending on the specific situation or time of day:

  • Crawford County Mental Health Center: 620-232-SAVE (7283) (available 24 hours)

  • Via Christi Hospital, Emergency Department: 620-232-0123 or 911 (available 24 hours)

  • University Counseling Services: 620-235-4452 (Monday–Friday, 8:00 A.M.–4:00 P.M.)

  • Campus Police: 620-235-4624 (available 24 hours)

If this crisis occurs during regular business hours (8:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M.), walk the student to UCS in the Bryant Student Health Center. Once UCS is aware of the situation, a staff member will assess the student’s safety.

A student should be referred whenever you believe their difficulties have gone beyond their capacity to cope with the situation and beyond your own ability to be helpful. Some students will initially find some relief when provided the opportunity to discuss their concerns. However, other students may feel more comfortable talking with a third party. Here are some points to remember:

  • For non-emergent situations, it may be best to call UCS on behalf of the student while they are still with you. The student can then be given an appointment and any further instructions.

  • If you have more serious concerns about a student’s willingness or ability to follow through with an appointment, it may be best to walk the student to the UCS office.

  • For students who prefer off-campus resources, we can provide you with additional referral information. Off-campus resources can also be found below by clicking on 'Community Resources'.

  • If you consider the situation to be an emergency, call 911 before contacting UCS. Do not delay attending to issues that concern safety.

If you would like to discuss any general or specific student concerns, please contact us at 620-235-4452 or stop by UCS at the Bryant Student Health Center (1801 S. Broadway). Our office hours are Monday - Friday, 8:00 A.M - 4:00 P.M. For emergency assistance, call 911.

It’s important for faculty and staff to take steps to ensure a distressed student receives assistance. Even so, it's equally important to have a set of boundaries. Appropriate boundaries can prevent faculty and staff from getting "in too deep" or feeling burned-out. You may need to be extra mindful of your boundaries. Here are some common signs that a student may need additional help:

  • The student is contacting you more than that of a typical student.

  • You find yourself speaking with the student on the weekends or over holidays more than that of a typical student.

  • You are the student’s sole source of support.

  • The student’s difficulties have gone past your level of expertise.

  • You are beginning to lose interest in helping the student or you’re declining or avoiding meeting with the student.

  • Helping the student is beginning to have a negative impact on your job or social life.

  • You or others in your office frequently ask yourselves what to do.

No matter how much support you offer, the student ultimately has to make the decision themselves to seek help. If you have concerns, UCS can provide assistance on how to approach a student, most effectively communicate with a student, or directly intervene with a student. Call to speak with a UCS staff member Monday – Friday, 8:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M. at 620-235-4452.

Information for Students
  • Information
  • Identifying a Fellow Student in Distress
  • Assisting a Fellow Student in Distress
  • What to Do in a Crisis
  • Recognizing the limits of what you can and can't do
  • Consult with University Counseling Services
Are you concerned about a friend’s emotional state? Talking with a friend about your concerns may be helpful, but finding the right words to say can be challenging. It might also be uncomfortable to have a conversation with a friend about his or her emotional health and can often cross the boundaries of a typical friendship.

Deciding to have a conversation with a friend about his or her emotional health may be difficult and met with resistance. This might mean saying things your friend doesn’t want to hear or saying something your friend might initially get upset about. It could cause a rift in your friendship, but still be the right thing to do. 

Use this guide to help you identify when a friend is struggling and what you can do to help.

Everyone experiences stress, which is a normal part of life. When we experience distress our ability to cope with maybe impaired. If you suspect a friend is experiencing emotional distress, it can be difficult to identify. Here are signs that may indicate a friend is experiencing emotional distress:

Concerning Behaviors:

  • Change in personal hygiene

  • Dramatic changes in weight

  • Falling asleep in class

  • Loss of interest in activities

  • Emotional outbursts or crying

  • Increased anxiety, hyperactivity, or inflated self-esteem

  • Withdrawal from social interactions

  • Agitation, restlessness, or aggressive comments

  • Misuse of alcohol or drugs

Academic Concerns:

  • Worsening test performance

  • Excessive absences or tardiness

  • Decreased quality of work

  • Reduced class participation

  • Repeated requests for favors or extensions on homework

  • Failing to meet deadlines/due dates

  • Frequent requests for appointments that go beyond that of a typical student

  • Excessive demands or dependency on faculty and staff

Stressful Life Events:

  • Relationship difficulties/conflicts

  • Traumatic loss of a friend or family member

  • Being a victim of assault or abuse

  • Conflicts with roommates or residential living staff

References to Suicide or Homicide:

  • Verbal or written references to suicide

  • Referencing feelings of hopelessness

  • Noting they feel like a burden, not belonging, or trapped

  • Homicidal threats

A single sign may not be cause for concern; however, changes that are noticeably severe or chronic may be indicative of a more serious problem.

If you decide to approach a friend, roommate, or classmate, first you should differentiate between urgent and non-urgent situations. If your friend is an imminent risk to themselves, see What to do in a Crisis. Otherwise, you may choose to address your concerns with a friend directly. If the situation is non-urgent, here are some things to look for: 

  • Talk with the student in private and simply listen.

  • Express your concerns without judgement.

  • Don’t minimize the situation (e.g., “This shouldn’t be an issue,” “Just move on,” “Shouldn’t you be over this by now?”, etc.)

  • Clarify your friend’s concerns and repeat it back so he or she feels understood.

  • Put yourself in their position to get a better understanding of what he or she may be going through.

Encourage the student to schedule an appointment with UCS. Remember these points:

  • Inform the student that all information shared in counseling is confidential and will not be reflected on their academic record.

  • Help the student understand that counseling services are used by many students.

  • Inform the student that there is no charge for the first appointment and he or she can speak to a counselor once without making a commitment to ongoing therapy.

  • Suggest the student visit our website to familiarize him or herself to counseling and the services we offer.

  • Provide the student with the phone number to our office (620-235-4452) or offer to walk him or her to UCS to schedule an appointment.

  • The decision to seek counseling is voluntary. However, your encouragement can motivate the student to attend.

If you have a concern regarding behavioral/general concerns, violations of university policy, or misconduct which does not involve domestic or dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, harassment, retaliation, or bias based discrimination please report below.

Distiguishing between a "theoretical" discussion of suicide and the personal anguish of "not knowing if life is worth living" can be difficult. If you're uncertain about a student's intentions, simply ask them to clarify their thoughts. There is no harm in discussing the topic of suicide in an open manner. If in the course of your conversation with a student, the how, when, and/or where of suicide is specified, you should immediately refer for help (this includes both verbal and/or written threats). Here is a list of potential contacts; who you contact first may vary depending on the specific situation or time of day:

  • Crawford County Mental Health Center: 620-232-SAVE (7283) (available 24 hours)

  • Via Christi Hospital, Emergency Department: 620-232-0123 or 911 (available 24 hours)

  • University Counseling Services: 620-235-4452 (Monday–Friday, 8:00 A.M.–4:00 P.M.)

  • Campus Police: 620-235-4624 (available 24 hours)

If this crisis occurs during regular business hours (8:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M.), walk the student to UCS in the Bryant Student Health Center. Once UCS is aware of the situation, a staff member will assess the student’s safety.

If you’ve been assisting a friend experiencing emotional distress, it’s important to keep your own wellbeing in mind. It’s also important to recognize when the difficulty of your friend’s situation has gone beyond your own capacity to help. Here are some examples:

What you can do:

  • Be supportive, listen to their concerns, and make a genuine effort to help.

  • Respect other’s boundaries.

  • Be aware of your own wellbeing and seek support if needed.

  • Be mindful of how much time you actually have to help someone before it starts to negatively affect your own life.

What you can’t do:

  • Try to “fix things” and manage the stress of someone else’s situation.

  • Force someone to seek counseling or take your advice.

  • Make a decisions for others.

  • Ignore your own responsibilities because of the time put towards helping someone else.

Remember, no matter how much help you offer, the student ultimately has to make the decision themselves to seek help.

If you have questions or concerns about the mental health of a friend, UCS provides consultation services. Here are topics that could be addressed:

  • Evaluating the seriousness of a situation.

  • Information about self-help resources and on or off-campus resources. These resources may be helpful to give a friend you are concerned about.

  • Addressing your own feelings about the situation.

  • Measures you can take to help a friend, including the best way to approach the situation.

  • How to refer a fellow PSU student to UCS.

  • Encouraging a fellow PSU student to schedule an appointment with UCS.

If you would like to schedule an appointment, call 620-235-4452 or walk to the Bryant Student Health Center and our front desk staff will assist you.

What We Offer
  • Individual Therapy
  • Couples Therapy
  • Psychological Testing
  • Nutrition
  • Training

University students normally encounter various stressors during their college experience.  These may include coping with new academic demands, feelings of anxiety or depression, making and maintaining new friendships, and adjusting to changing relationships with parents and other family members.  Stress, however, can become overwhelming and threaten the college experience and academic progress.  University Counseling Services (UCS) can help you resolve personal concerns or difficulties to better manage your situation.  Working one-on-one with a therapist can provide you valuable feedback, a different perspective on your situation, and equip you with new methods of coping.  UCS offers a range of psychological and mental health counseling services for current students of Pittsburg State University (PSU).  Services are provided in a supportive and confidential atmosphere and are tailored to address the concerns of a student.  Sessions are offered to help students with a variety of problem areas such as:

  • Anxiety and/or Stress

  • Attention Difficulties

  • Depression

  • Eating Disorders/Body Image Concerns

  • Grief/Loss

  • Interpersonal Difficulties

  • Low Motivation

  • Low Self-Esteem

  • Panic

  • Sleep Difficulties

  • Substance Misuse/Abuse

  • Trauma, including sexual assault

Many concerns can be addressed using a brief, solution-focused approach, often requiring only a few visits.  Individual counseling sessions are usually from 30 to 60 minutes in length, depending on the needs of the student.  Sessions are one-on-one with a therapist who will help you work toward specific goals and work through your concerns.  UCS also works in close collaboration with the Student Health Services (SHS) to offer an integrated behavioral and medical health care service.

University Counseling Services (UCS) offers couples therapy to students who are in a relationship, married or not.  Both individuals who make up the couple, must be eligible students at PSU.  Depending on the level of distress present in the relationship, therapy may be brief, requiring only a few visits, or more long-term.  Couples therapy sessions are offered to help those with a variety of concerns such as:

  • Communication problems

  • Concerns regarding intimacy

  • Coping with family conflict

  • Pre-marital counseling

  • Problem-solving/conflict resolution skills

  • Substance Misuse/Abuse

  • Trauma

  • And more!

Psychological assessments are one part of services provided at UCS in order to offer comprehensive and individualized treatment to PSU students.  Psychological testing can be helpful in better understanding a person’s problem areas, as well as identifying strengths to cope with your current situation.  A wide range of psychological assessments can be administered and interpreted at UCS in order to obtain the best form of treatment or intervention for a PSU student.  Psychological assessments to acquire student accommodations, to support psychotherapeutic services, or to support pharmacological treatment can be administered at UCS.  Testing can address a wide range of topics such as attention difficulties, learning disabilities, mood disorders, concussions, personality traits, personal strengths, and more.  Your therapist will discuss the costs and benefits of psychological testing if it is likely to be helpful in your situation.

UCS has contracted with the Crawford County Health Department to provide PSU students with a dietitian to help support them with their dietary needs.  The dietitian offers nutritional services to students in a supportive and confidential atmosphere.  The dietitian will work individually with students to plan a program of nutritional services to meet their needs in compliance with state and licensing boards.  Individual sessions are usually 30 to 60 minutes in length, depending on the needs of the student.

UCS provides mental health education, outreach, and consultation to PSU students, faculty, and staff.  Additionally, UCS provides graduate students in the Department of Psychology and Counseling with practicum and internship opportunities.

Appointment Information
  • Appointments & Fees
  • Eligibility Requirements
  • Referrals
  • What should I expect during my first visit?
  • Confidentiality

To schedule an appointment with University Counseling Services (UCS), contact the Bryant Student Health Center (BSHC) at 620-235-4452, or see the receptionists at the BSHC front desk anytime between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. 

Prior to your first appointment, please give advanced thought to your personal and medical history.  Upon arrival for your first appointment, please check-in at the desk before being seated.  You should arrive 15 minutes before your first appointment, as you will need to complete a brief registration form prior to being seen.  Please bring your valid PSU ID card to your appointments.  The front desk attendants will assist you with the check-in process and can direct you to the UCS private waiting room.

If you cannot keep an appointment, please give at least a 24 hour notice.  Students who fail to show up for, or cancel scheduled appointments deny appointments to other students in need.  Therefore, students who do not cancel or reschedule appointments at least 24 hours in advance will be charged a missed appointment fee of $15.  Students with PSU Health Insurance will be responsible for the $15 fee; your insurance will not be billed. 

Fees

Individual Therapy

  • 1st Appointment

    • 60-90 minutes
      No Charge

  • 2nd – 10th Appointments

    • 25 minutes
      $ 8.00

    • 60 minutes
      $15.00

  • 11th + Appointments

    • 25 minutes
      $15.00

    • 60 minutes
      $25.00

Marital/Couples Therapy

  • 1st Appointment

    • 60-90 minutes
      No Charge

  • 2nd – 10th Appointments

    • 60 minutes
      $20.00

  • 11th + Appointments

    • 60 minutes
      $30.00

Psychological Testing

  • Time Varies with Test
    Cost Varies with Test

Mandated Substance Abuse Evaluation (Referral by Pittsburg State University only)

  •  $65.00

Missed Counseling Appointment Fee

  • $15.00

Nutrition

  • Initial Nutritional Evaluation
    $30

  • Follow-up Nutritional Appointments
    $15

  • Missed Nutritional Appointment Fee (not canceled within 24 hours)
    Cost of appointment

Insurance

For students with PSU Student Health Insurance, UCS will file the claim for you and you will be billed for the portion not paid by insurance. Please refer to your policy for specific coverage. For other health plans, a receipt can be provided to you to file with your insurance carrier.

The charges for your appointment are to be paid in full at the time of check-out. You are responsible for your complete bill. Please speak to the receptionist at the front desk if you have any questions about your bill.

Any student currently enrolled at Pittsburg State University is eligible for services at University Counseling Services (UCS). Student Spouse Coverage is available after paying an eligibility fee. Services are not available to other dependents.

SUMMER SERVICE: Students who were enrolled for the spring semester, not attending in the summer session, but pre-enrolled for the fall semester, are eligible for UCS services with payment of the summer student health fee.  Students enrolled in online summer courses are eligible for UCS services with payment of the summer student health fee.  The summer student health fee is included in the cost of on-campus summer courses, therefore, students enrolled in on-campus summer courses are eligible to utilize summer services at UCS without paying any additional fees.

A valid PSU identification card may be required to access services at UCS.

The Bryant Student Health Center offers the privilege of students acquiring well-rounded health care conveniently in one building.  University Counseling Services (UCS) maintains a collaborative relationship with Student Health Services (SHS) to offer integrated behavioral and medical health care services. 

While seeing a therapist at UCS, students may receive the recommendation of attending a medical consultation and/or evaluation with SHS.  Should you be started on any pharmacological treatment regimens during the course of psychotherapy, your therapist may collaborate closely with your prescriber to ensure you are receiving the best form of treatment to help you perform successfully while attending Pittsburg State University (PSU).

At times, students may be best served by other agencies or offices on campus; the UCS may make a referral for you to visit with another PSU office when appropriate.  Additionally the UCS may see fit to make outside referrals to agencies in the community or surrounding Pittsburg, KS area depending on the needs of the student.

During the first session, you and your therapist will work together to clarify your concerns and goals. At UCS, students are encouraged to actively participate in determining the services that may be most helpful to accomplish their goals. Based on the information gathered in the first visit, you and your therapist will determine the services or resources that will best serve your needs. Therapists at UCS will answer questions that you may have. The staff at UCS is composed of licensed psychologists, licensed professional counselors, and graduate students.

Student health information is confidential and jointly maintained by University Counseling Services (UCS) and Student Health Services (SHS) electronically. Student health information is accessible and exchanged between UCS and SHS for the purpose of coordinating care. PSU does not release private health information about a student without that student’s written permission, except in the case of imminent danger to themselves or others, child/dependent abuse, court order, or where otherwise required by law. Notations of counseling services are not part of a student’s academic record at PSU.

Notice of Privacy Practices

Consent for Release of Information Form

Resources


Campus Resources

Click here to learn about resources offered by various offices on the PSU campus. PSU is dedicated to seeing Gorillas succeed in all areas of health, wellness, and academics; here you will find a list of offices filled with PSU employees who are eager to offer their assistance!

Community Resources

Click here to learn about resources offered in the community of Pittsburg, Kansas. Pittsburg is invested in seeing the students of PSU succeed; here you will find a list of resources that may be beneficial as you strive to achieve a successful experience at PSU.

Recommended Websites

Click here to find helpful websites that have been reviewed by University Counseling Services.  These websites address a variety of concerns and can be useful in providing educational information regarding various topics.

Recommended Apps

Click here to find helpful applications for your device that have been reviewed by University Counseling Services. These applications address a variety of concerns and can be used to supplement the work you do in therapy or used to assist with self-improvement.

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About Us


  • Steven B. Mayhew, Ph.D., ABPP
  • Madison V. Estrada, M.S., T-LMLP
  • Trent A. Becker, M.S., T-LMLP
  • Lori A. Erwin, M.S., LPC
  • Linda Timme, M.S., RD, LD
  • Jeffrey M. Burch, Psy.D.

Dr. Mayhew is a licensed psychologist by the State of Kansas Behavioral Science Regulatory Board. He holds board certification in Counseling Psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP), and he is certified by the National Register of Health Service Psychologists. Dr. Mayhew completed his Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from the University of Missouri-Columbia. His clinical interests include psychopharmacology, major depression, and evaluation and treatment of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Mrs. Estrada is a graduate of Pittsburg State University’s Clinical Psychology Master’s program.  She is a licensed master’s level psychologist, at the temporary status, by the Kansas Behavioral Science Regulatory Board.  She provides both individuals and couples therapy to PSU students, psychological assessment services, and plays an active role in mental health outreach on campus and in the Pittsburg community.  Her clinical interests include depression and anxiety disorders, stress management, exercise interventions as an adjunct to therapy, and health promotion.

Mr. Becker is a licensed temporary master's level psychologist by the Kansas Behavioral Science Regulatory Board.  He completed his Master's degree in Clinical Psychology at Pittsburg State University.  He provides individual therapy, couples therapy, and psychological assessment services to PSU students.  His interests include anxiety and depression, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and psychopharmacology.

Ms. Erwin is a licensed professional counselor by the Kansas Behavioral Science Regulatory Board. She completed her Master's degree in Counseling at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville. She provides both individual and couples counseling to PSU students and has special interests in stress management, relationship conflicts, anxiety, depression, and grief and loss issues.

Ms. Timme is a registered dietitian in the state of Kansas. Ms. Timme works with PSU students on an individual basis providing nutritional counseling and guidance.

Dr. Burch has been a consulting psychologist to University Counseling Services since January of 2017.  He is a licensed psychologist by the State of Kansas Behavioral Science Regulatory Board.  He earned his Master's and Doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the University of Indianapolis.  Dr. Burch is a full-time psychologist at Via Christi Hospital – Pittsburg.  His clinical interests include psychotic disorders, anxiety, projective testing, autism, and addictions.

Contact Us


University Counseling Services

Bryant Student Health Center
1801 South Broadway
Pittsburg, KS 66762

(620) 235-4452

Contact University Counseling Services